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Russian intel officers indicted for hacking Democrats in 2016 U.S. election

Russian intel officers indicted for hacking Democrats in 2016 U.S. election

The legal action is part of the investigation of special counsel Robert Mueller.

Russian Federation has denied any involvement in the attack and rejected accusations that it interfered in the United States presidential election in a bid to bring about the defeat of Democrat Hillary Clinton.

Russia's Foreign Ministry is denouncing the United States' indictment of 12 alleged military intelligence agents accused of hacking into Democratic accounts in the 2016 U.S. elections.

The defendants, according to the indictment, were specifically involved in the effort to hack Clinton campaign chairman John Podesta.

The Kremlin denied anew that it tried to sway the election. His team is investigating efforts by Russian Federation to influence the 2016 US presidential election.

By June 2016, the defendants began planning the release of tens of thousands of stolen emails and documents, the indictment alleges. It says the information acquired by "spearfishing" and other hacking techniques was released via online fronts DCLeaks and Guccifer 2.0.

The unfolding drama on both sides of the Atlantic reflected how Trump's presidency has been overshadowed by the Mueller probe from its earliest moments and how the investigation frequently tramples the President's attempts to carve out favorable headlines.

However, "there's no allegation in this indictment that the Americans knew they were corresponding with Russian intelligence officers", he said. They also allegedly fed the information to an "organization" - unnamed in the indictment, but which appears to be Wikileaks - as well as a congressional candidate, a lobbyist and a journalist.

US indictments against a dozen Russian intelligence officers on Friday provided detailed technical evidence to back up allegations of Russian hacking and leaking of information to influence the 2016 USA presidential election.

The White House echoed some of those sentiments.

Special Counsel Robert Mueller's wide-net Russian Federation investigation has officially resulted in 191 criminal charges against 35 defendants, and that count may only rise. "There is no debate that the Russians meddled in the election". "Anything you do, it's always going to be, 'Oh, Russia, he loves Russia'".

That evening, the indictment says, the Russians attempted to break into email accounts used by Clinton's personal office, along with 76 Clinton campaign email addresses.

Hours before the Justice Department announcement, Mr Trump complained anew that the special counsel's investigation is complicating his efforts to forge a better working relationship with Russian Federation. The ministry says "obviously, the goal of this is to spoil the atmosphere" before Monday's summit between President Vladimir Putin and President Trump in Helsinki, Finland.

After the indictments were announced, top Senate Democrat Chuck Schumer called on Trump to cancel his meeting with Putin until Russian Federation takes steps to prove it won't interfere in future elections.

"I will absolutely, firmly ask the question, and hopefully we'll have a good relationship with Russian Federation", he told a joint press conference with British Prime Minister Theresa May.

"When we confront foreign interference in American elections, it is important for us to avoid thinking politically as Republicans or Democrats and instead to think patriotically as Americans", he said. Indeed, an indictment that directly points to Russian President Vladimir Putin makes it much more hard for critics to dismiss Russia's culpability in election hacking as unproven.