Culture&Arts

Moonves' negotiated exit shows the power of #TimesUp

Moonves' negotiated exit shows the power of #TimesUp

"It is our belief that CBS' new permanent Chairman and CEO will have the requisite authority to function effectively as a Commissioner and to demonstrate CBS' commitment to the Commission's critical mission".

Moonves stepped down on Sunday after the latest story about him was published by Ronan Farrow in The New Yorker.

With those optics in mind, CBS said Sunday night that Moonves and CBS will donate $20 million to organizations that support the #MeToo movement and other groups fighting for workplace equity for women.

"Remember that the world is watching", the statement said.

Chen later issued a two-sentence statement on the matter on The Talk.

Osbourne said that she was asked "a couple of months ago" to make a statement in support of Moonves when the first wave of accusations came to light.

CBS chief executive Les Moonves is exiting the company, effective immediately, amid a flurry of sexual misconduct allegations. This has hurt morale, but there are some really, really good people that come to work every single day.

Moonves kept a relatively low profile in August, but remained in charge of the broadcasting behemoth.

Moonves was removed from those top posts on Sunday, after new allegations of sexual misconduct and assault surfaced. That move gives Moonves a victory in that arena; he sought to keep CBS operating as a separate concern. The $20 million would come out of any compensation Moonves is due to receive following the conclusion of an ongoing investigation into the allegations against him.

Moonves, 68, joined CBS in 1995 and became CEO in 2006. CBS has spent much of his tenure as the nation's most popular broadcast network, with hits like "The Big Bang Theory" and "NCIS", and its success has made Moonves one of the highest-paid and most powerful executives in the business. The women in Sunday's report echoed descriptions of a culture of playing down accusations and promoting men even after the company settled allegations against them.

In Farrow's latest article, both a former TV executive and a former assistant to Moonves said the CEO had forced them to perform oral sex when they worked together.

At another time, she said an angry Moonves pushed her hard against a wall.

"The tech companies are replacing these legacy media companies", he said.

"These are more numerous claims, these are six women all of them on the record, also describing more serious allegations", Farrow said on CNN's "Reliable Sources" shortly after The New Yorker published the followup. While all four women offered support for Julie Chen, Underwood was passionate about saying she was happy Chen was now free from the weight and burden of the "lies" she has had to carry. Other women told the magazine of unwanted touching or advances.

"The appalling accusations in this article are untrue".

"I have never used my position to hinder the advancement or careers of women", he said. I didn't know what was going to happen to me, ' she said.

Moonves' resignation comes after new claims of sexual misconduct. "Today we say, enough is enough and today we say we believe in you, we hear you".